A view of the copper coin and coinage of England
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A view of the copper coin and coinage of England ... With copper-plates. By Thomas Snelling. by Thomas Snelling

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Published by printed for T. Snelling in London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesEighteenth century -- reel 625, no. 5.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination[4],46,6p.,plates
Number of Pages466
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16990929M

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A View of the Silver Coin and Coinage of England, from the Norman Conquest to the Present Time. Consider d with Regard to Type, Legend, Sorts, Rarity, Weight, Fineness and Value. with Copper-Plates. (Paperback) by Thomas Snelling and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at A Brief History of British Regal Copper Production during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. On Thursday August 1, , Charles II demonetized tokens and announced the government would begin making copper small change coins in a proclamation entitled "A Proclamation for making currant His Majestie's Farthings and Half-pence of Copper, and forbidding all others to be used" (printed in. A View of the Silver Coin and Coinage of England, from the Norman Conquest to the Present Time: Consider'd with Regard to Type, Legend, Sorts, Rarity, Weight, Fineness and Value: with Copper Plates Eighteenth century collections online: Author: Thomas Snelling: Publisher: T. Snelling, Original from: Oxford University: Digitized: Feb 5.   For three centuries, however, the several copper and bronze coins of small value were mainstays in the commerce of Britain. Copper as a coinage metal was generally shunned by Britain until the reign of Charles II () and had appeared only in the form of undated farthings (equal to one-fourth of a penny), these competing with various.

Coin Pre-decimalisation value Post-decimalisation value Dates of use Notes Mite 1 ⁄ 24 d; see notes £; see notes: Tudor dates, back to Anglo-Saxon England, at least.: In Tudor times, mites weren't minted but were used in accounting; one mite was one twenty-fourth of a penny or one sixth of a farthing. In older times, a mite could be worth half a farthing or 1 ⁄ 8 d; or about one. Book from the collections of Commencing from page 95 of the PDF is the same author's "View of the Gold Coin and Coinage of England, from Henry the Third to the Present Time, Consider'd with regard to Type, Legend, Sorts, Rarity, Weight Fineness, Value, and Proportion" (). From p is "A View of the Copper Coin and Coinage of England. 'Coin' orientation, where the reverse is upside down when you turn the coin sideways. 'Medal' orientation, where the reverse is upright when you turn the coin sideways. Modern US 'silver' coins use the 'coin' orientation, as do most UK copper coins prior to . Coin Value Price Chart for Foreign and World Coins General. Lookup Coin values for Good, Very Good, Fine, Very Fine, Brilliant Uncirculated & Proof conditions and MS grade. How much Foreign and World Coins General are worth. Buy & Sell. Coins for sale for Foreign and World Coins type General items.

View of the gold coin and coinage of England, from Henry the Third to the present time. London: Printed for T. Snelling, next the Horn Tavern, in Fleet-Street, who buys and sells all sorts of coins and medals, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Snelling. USA Coin Book - An easy and simple way to buy, sell, auction off and keep track of coins online. Look up coin prices and values to see how much your collection is worth. Connect with dealers, other coin collectors and put coins up on your wishlist look up coin prices and values and ask for coins on your wishlist to make offers for. Even keep track of your coin collection in an online database.   One little highlight of my early collecting was that I was the subject of a cover story in World Coin News published on 14 May Learning about the English hammered series has been a bit daunting for me. There are so few books in the libraries here on coins . Copper has been used to make coins for currency since about BC – see The Timeline of Copper. The ancient Romans recognised the value of this material and used a wide variety of copper coins. Centuries later, the Gold Standard gave way to the Copper Standard for coins of all values due to copper’s long-lasting properties.